Police honor colleagues killed in service

Officer Dawn Memorial Ride’s Journey

With a memorial trip to Bruchsal, about 200 police officers memorialized colleagues who were injured or killed while on duty. The idea came to the chief inspector in Karlsruhe after a particularly despicable act at the end of January.

FLAGING THE FLAG: Hulk Opitz of Münster is the European Chief of the Blue Knights.

Photo: © Peter Sandbiller Peter Sandbiller

At 1:37 on Saturday afternoon, the silence around Schloss Gottesaue ended. Men and women in motorcycle gear wear their helmets and start their engines.

A sight invasive to the eyes, ears, and nose – but with a very dangerous backdrop. According to the organizers, about 200 participating police officers are making themselves heard by their high performance: for colleagues who have been injured or killed while on duty.

From Schloss Gottesaue they lead a caravan to Bruchsal. One of them is Corina Dibrich, the chief inspector of the Karlsruhe police. She’s not just one of many, but she’s probably the most important person of the day.

Karlsruhe policewoman has an idea for ‘Officer Dawn Memorial Journey’

She had the idea for “Officer Dawn Memorial Ride’s Journey,” a memorial trip for police officers who were killed. A sad event on the night of January 31 this year was decisive. At that time, a female police commissioner candidate and her school near Kosel in the Rhineland-Palatinate were shot, probably by a poacher.

Idea Presenter: Chief Inspector Corina Debrech began the commemorative trip.

Photo: Photo: Peter Sandbiller

Corina Dibrich remembers saying this to herself after the crime: “It couldn’t have been killing police officers on duty.” Then an idea came to her: As Head of the Blue Knights Nordbaden, she inspired fellow Blue Knights Saar-Mosel’s Nicole Urschel Schroeder to organize a big memorial trip starting in Karlsruhe.

The Blue Knights are the clubs of motorcycle police officers all over the world

Blue Knights are found all over the world. Police officers riding motorbikes organized themselves into clubs to have fun – but above all to do good. After Kusel’s crime, many donations came from the so-called season clubs. With the grand celebration round on Saturday, the noble commitment of the Knights found its temporary climax.

After all, the event was a true European premiere. This is pointed out by Hulk Opitz of Münster. Blue Knights Europe CEO says such tours are a long-standing tradition in the United States. Now he wants to hold these events all over Europe after the start in Karlsruhe.

Our lives can change at any moment

Police Commissioner Karen Diner

High-ranking visitors visit the “Commemorative Journey” from Karlsruhe to Brussels: At Gotesau Castle, Chief of Police Karin Diener spoke to knights in their blue leather jackets decorated with numerous insignia. The great danger is part of the work of nearly 300,000 police officers in Germany. “Our lives can change at any moment,” Denner says. Even training, and the best security and personal protective equipment can’t prevent this.

It makes an appeal to society as a whole: it must support the police, loudly condemn such actions, and resolutely oppose the growing desire to use violence. She praises the Blue Knights’ commitment as “a great commitment that goes beyond service.”

Verbs like Kusel are forgotten very quickly.

Police Commissioner Karen Diner

She says in an interview with BNN that the idea of ​​Corina Debrich is equally brilliant. “Deeds like Kusel are forgotten very quickly. Such a thing can happen again at any moment. “It has already “happened” here: twelve officers of the current and former district of responsibility of the Karlsruhe police headquarters, that is, the city and district of Karlsruhe, the city of Pforzheim, have lost Incres and Calo County its life of service.

Passers-by photograph the memorial journey with mobile phones

In 2021 alone, 179 officers were injured, according to police spokesman, Ralph Minnett. Insults are also included in the number, but arrests often lead to fractures, bruises, bruises and abrasions. Protestant police chaplain Daniel Paulus begins by telling the participants that the world is not like a children’s room, where police operations with theatrical characters or in radio plays always end well.

The outside world can be cruel, says Deacon, pointing to Cosell. With his blessing, he said goodbye to the motorcyclists in the direction of Bruchsal. Starting at 1.37pm he’s also one of the many people along the way who pull out their cell phones to photograph the descent of the modern knights.

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